Lord Lugard — Tieing Together India, Nigeria, East. Africa, Hong Kong…

As a child of both South Asia and Nigeria (South Asian heritage, but born and, till I was a teenager, bred in Nigeria), I and many others like me often look at our Nigerian “world” and our South Asian “world”s as separate and only connected by our lives. Or many other fellow Nigerians in this group with parts of their lives in the Americans might think similarly. The connections between the British colonial system in places like the Americas, India, and East, South & West Africa (Nigeria and Ghana, mainly) are often lost. Here’s a summary of the bio of “Lord Lugard”, who every Nigerian school child grows up learning named and set up the entity we now know as “our own dear native land”, the 1st Governor-General of the Colony and Protectorate of Nigeria:

“Lugard was born in Madras (now Chennai) in India, but was raised in Worcester, England. He was the son of the Reverend F. G. Lugard, a British Army Chaplain at Madras…commissioned into the 9th Foot (East Norfolk Regiment) in 1878, joining the second battalion in India…serving in the Afghan War of 1879–1880, in the Sudan campaign of 1884–1885, and in Burma in 1886–1887. In May 1888, while on temporary half-pay, he took command of an expedition organized by the British settlers in Nyasaland against the Arab slave traders on Lake Nyasa…He was High Commissioner of the Protectorate of Northern Nigeria from 1900 to 1906…He was governor of Hong Kong from July 1907 to until March 1912…when he returned to Nigeria as Governor of the two protectorates, and was made Governor-General 1914–1919 after Northern and Southern Nigeria were joined under one administration.”

[I originally wrote this as a contribution to one of the Facebook Groups run by the Nigerian Nostalgia Project, a delightful effort whose collections of photographs you should really check out here, here, or here.]

Photo by British Library on Unsplash

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Rhetor—Citizen—Fakir // Pakistani-American. Californian. Karachiite. Awadhi by culture. Nigerian by birth // Currently working on Chronicles of the Camps

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Rhetor—Citizen—Fakir // Pakistani-American. Californian. Karachiite. Awadhi by culture. Nigerian by birth // Currently working on Chronicles of the Camps

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